Broadcast to ballots: Kathleen Matthews latest journo to make the jump

Former broadcaster Kathleen Matthews, and her husband, MSNBC host Chris Matthews.  (Sipa USA)

Former broadcaster Kathleen Matthews, and her husband, MSNBC host Chris Matthews. (Sipa USA)

Kathleen Matthews, a former local news anchor and wife of MSNBC host Chris Matthews, announced Wednesday her candidacy to replace Maryland Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen, who is leaving his position to run for the U.S. Senate.

Matthews left her broadcast career in 2006 to join Marriott International. As she attempts to launch a political career, Matthews joins a robust group of people who replaced their microphones with megaphones.

If she wins, Matthews would not be alone in Congress. According to data provided by CQ Roll Call, there are currently 15 members of the U.S. Congress who have previously been journalists or media types.


Other politicians who worked in media include:

Al Gore

Gore is the former U.S. representative and senator who became vice president under Bill Clinton. Before his political career, he started as a Nashville scribe. After he returned from serving in the Vietnam War, he worked as a reporter at the Tennessean, reporting on bribery in politics in the paper’s city politics beat.  Gore returned to his journalism roots after his controversial loss to George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election, through his advocacy on global warming. He starred in the documentary An Inconvenient Truth, which won an Oscar.

Al Gore (Jason Merritt/Getty Images for Chrysalis)

Former vice president Al Gore (Jason Merritt, Getty Images for Chrysalis)

Sarah Palin

Palin, the former governor of Alaska and the Republican nominee for vice president in 2008, was also a journalist before her political career. In 1984, at the University of Idaho, Palin majored in journalism, specifically in broadcast news. After transferring to another school, she eventually returned to Idaho to receive her degree in journalism and briefly worked as a sportscaster at a local TV news station in Anchorage.

Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin (Bob Gathany, AL.com via AP)

Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin (Bob Gathany, AL.com via AP)

 J.D. Hayworth

The Arizona Republican cannot decide whether he wants to be a journalist or a politician. Hayworth began his career in broadcast television. He worked as a sportscaster for local NBC stations in both South Carolina and in Cincinnati in the 80s. Hayworth then entered the political arena, winning election to the U.S. House from Arizona in the 1994 GOP wave. He served until 2007, then returned to broadcasting, but he challenged Sen. John McCain in a Senate primary in 2010. After his defeat, he returned to talk shows; Hayworth currently hosts a show called America’s Forum on Newsmax TV.

Then-U.S. Senate candidate J.D. Hayworth speaks at a rally Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010 in Scottsdale, Ariz.  (Matt York, AP)

Then-U.S. Senate candidate J.D. Hayworth speaks at a rally Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (Matt York, AP)

Mike Rogers

Politicians also change careers to become journalists as well. This is the case with Mike Rogers, a former FBI agent who served as both a state senator and U.S. congressman from Michigan. After 14 years in Congress, he retired last year and has created his own talk show called “Something to Think About with Mike Rogers.” The show began airing on Jan. 5, 2015.

House Intelligence Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., was a frequent guest on Face the Nation and other Sunday talk shows. (Chris Usher, CBS News via AP)

House Intelligence Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., was a frequent guest on Face the Nation and other Sunday talk shows. (Chris Usher, CBS News via AP)

Steve Forbes

Not every news person has made the transition successfully. Forbes is a two-time candidate for president of the United States, but he has done better as the editor-in-chief of Forbes magazine. Forbes put aside his journalism career to pursue campaigning as a Republican candidate in the 1996 primaries, carrying only two states. He tried again in 2000 but did no better and was out of the race by February.

Chairman and Editor-In-Chief of Forbes Media, Steve Forbes addresses the Hertiage Foundation March 16, 2015.  ( Jim Watson, AFP/Getty Images )

Chairman and Editor-In-Chief of Forbes Media Steve Forbes addresses the Heritage Foundation on March 16, 2015. ( Jim Watson, AFP/Getty Images )

 

Article source: http://onpolitics.usatoday.com/2015/06/04/kathleen-matthews-journalists-politicians-palin-gore/